Overhead Drone Video of a Farmer Herding Cattle Into Simple ‘Cow Art’ With a Truck

Farmer Derek Klingenberg of Klingenberg Farms Studios, who recently gained a YouTube following by calling cows with trombone covers of “Jingle Bells” and Lorde songs, has begun using his truck and what is most likely feed of some kind to herd cattle into “#CowArt.” In the video, captured by a stationary drone flying overhead, Klingenberg quickly discovers that even simple shapes are tough when dealing with living animals.

via Vice The Creators Project

Beautiful Illuminated Cut Paper Sculptures by Nermin Er

Cut Paper Sculptures by Nermin Er

Turkish artist Nermin Er uses layering and backlighting to create entrancing cut paper art that has a wonderful sense of depth. Her work varies between beautiful circular constructions and whimsical narrative scenes, while she also works in animation. More of Er’s work can be viewed on Artsy. And for more illuminated paper art, check out the cut paper light boxes of Hari & Deepti.

Cut Paper Sculptures by Nermin Er

Cut Paper Sculptures by Nermin Er

Cut Paper Sculptures by Nermin Er

Cut Paper Sculptures by Nermin Er

via Boing Boing

NASA Day of Remembrance, Honoring the Brave People Who Lost Their Lives in the Pursuit of Space Exploration

Day of Remembrance
NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and his wife Alexis lay a wreath at Arlington National Cemetery
photo by Joel Kowsky via NASA

Today NASA observes its Day of Remembrance, a day to honor people who have lost their lives in the name of space exploration while in line of service to NASA.

President Barack Obama issued a statement in observance of this year’s Day of Remembrance.

Despite the dangers [of space travel], we continue to reach for the stars, study the wonders of the universe, and learn more about the planet we call home. As a country, we support the innovators hard at work on the next generation of cutting-edge research and innovation. We seek to inspire the young people pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. From new partnerships with private industry to the development of groundbreaking inventions that Americans will take with them into the Solar System and eventually to Mars, we will continue our journey of discovery.

With every challenge overcome, with every mission safely accomplished, we honor those who gave their lives for the cause of exploration. We will continue to build on their discoveries and their technical achievements, and guided by their courage and determination, to lead the world in exploring the mysteries of space.

Virgil “Gus” Grissom, Edward White, and Roger Chaffee of the Apollo 1 mission were killed when a fire broke out during preflight testing on the launch pad on January 27, 1967.

Apollo 1
photo via NASA

Twenty-nine years ago today, on January 28, 1986, engine failure caused the destruction of the Shuttle Challenger mere moments after launch, killing all seven crewmembers onboard: Francis R. Scobee, Michael J. Smith, Judith A. Resnik, Ellison S. Onizuka, Ronald E. McNair, Gregory B. Jarvis, and Sharon Christa McAuliffe.

Challenger Crew
photo via NASA

On February 1, 2003, the Columbia disintegrated over Texas and Louisiana while reentering Earth’s atmosphere due to a piece of foam shedding from the shuttle and damaging the left wing. The seven crewmembers on the shuttle—Rick D. Husband, William C. McCool, David Brown, Laurel Blair Salton Clark, Michael P. Anderson, Kalpana Chawla, as well as Israel’s first astronaut, Ilan Ramon—all perished.

Columbia
photo via NASA

Tibetan Monks Create a Breathtakingly Intricate Sand Mandala and Then Destroy It Ceremonially

In 2013 Tibetan monks from the Drepung Loseling Monastery built an elaborate five-foot diameter sand mandala at the Blanton Museum in Austin, Texas. This video documents the monks painstakingly creating the mandala by hand, as well as the ceremonial dismantling of the mandala at the end of the process. According to the museum, the mandala’s destruction is meant to signify “the impermanence of all that exists.”

via Digg

‘Driving Vehicles, Live And Let Live’, A Quaint 1947 Driver Safety Film Full of Crashing Model Cars

Hideous traffic accidents become quaint oopsies when rendered with model cars in “Driving Vehicles, Live And Let Live,” a 1947 driver safety film that was produced by Aetna Casualty and Surety Company.

via The Presurfer

A Supercut Compiling Every ‘Goddamn It’ From the First Nine Seasons of ‘It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia’

A supercut by Rat King compiles every “goddamn it” from the first nine seasons of It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia. Clocking in at more than six minutes, it’s evident from this video that the gang from the show shouts “goddamn it” an awful lot.

via reddit, The High Definite

‘Crash Course Astronomy’, A Fun and Informative New Educational Series Hosted by Phil Plait

Crash Course Astronomy is a fun and informative new series from Crash Course hosted by astronomer Phil Plait. The series breaks down complicated astronomy concepts in an easy to understand way using animation and narration by Plait. The first episode serves as a general introduction to the study of astronomy, and the second episode deals with making astronomical observations with the naked eye.

The series is made possible by a recently announced partnership between Crash Course and PBS Digital Studios. New episodes of the series are posted on every Thursday.

‘Asian Food’, An Illustrated ‘Domics’ Cartoon About Bringing ‘Exotic Food’ to School

In “Asian Food“, a recent episode of Domics, Toronto-based illustrator Dominic shares his childhood memories of the “exotic” food that he brought to school as a kid and how his classmates responded.

My biggest concern revolves around the snacks I brought. You see there’s this Filipino snack called
sweet corn and it has an uncanny resemblance to Corn Pops. I brought some to school one day in a sandwich bag and a classmate would come up to me and excitedly ask “Hey, can I have some? I love those.” And in my head I’m like wow, my non-Filipino classmate is not only aware of his Filipino snack but enjoys consuming them like I do. So she reaches end takes a handful and stuffs them in her mouth, chews for two seconds immediately changed her expression to disgust and regret.

via Tastefully Offensive

Artist Adds Creepy Fingers and Mouths to Ordinary Ceramic Dinnerware

Creepy Dinnerware With Mouths and Fingers by Ronit Baranga

In her wonderfully unsettling sculpture series Breakfast, artist Ronit Baranga adds mouths and fingers to otherwise normal ceramic plates, cups, and other dinnerware. Baranga has much more clay sculpture (much of it similarly creepy) on her site and Facebook page.

Creepy Dinnerware With Mouths and Fingers by Ronit Baranga

Creepy Dinnerware With Mouths and Fingers by Ronit Baranga

Creepy Dinnerware With Mouths and Fingers by Ronit Baranga

Creepy Dinnerware With Mouths and Fingers by Ronit Baranga

photos via Ronit Baranga

via Bored Panda

An Entertaining Explanation of How Certain Cheeses Got Their Names

In “24 Origins of Cheese Names” by Mental Floss, host John Green amusingly explains the provenance of a number of cheeses and how they came to be named. While most of the enumerated cheeses were named after a town or city, there were a few exceptions.

“Provolone is an Italian cheese meaning “large provola.” And Provola is a DIFFERENT Italian cheese. It’s believed that it was named after a tradition where religious leaders visiting the convent of San Lorenzo in Capua would be offered a mozze o provatura…means like a sample of the main cheese. And if the word mozze sounds familiar, it should. Because it would spin off into mozzarella. The Italian word mozzare means “to cut off.” And the cheese is made by cutting curds and making them into balls.”

Green also provides the sordid history of “American cheese”.

“Finally, I return to my salon to tell you that American cheese got its name in the late 18th century because colonists in the Americas started exporting cheddar cheese back to Britain. So, it was the English who dubbed it “American cheese.” For a while, it was known here as yellow or store cheese, then about a century later it got nicknameslike “factory cheese,” “rattrap cheese,” or “rat cheese.” But you know, there’s something about the name “American cheese” that’s just a little more appetizing.”

True that.