A Search Dog’s Sense of Smell Is Tested as It Tries to Find a Canister of Pork Meat Buried 23 Feet Deep in a Lake

Naturalist and BBC broadcaster Chris Packham recently traveled to Northern Ireland to witness a search dog (Fern) get its sense of smell put to the test during episode 1 of Inside the Animal Mind on BBC Two. The canine’s keen nose had its work cut out for it as it attempted to find a canister filled with pork meat buried 23 feet deep in a lake.

Openmix, A Tiny Portable Audio Mixer That Lets Users Mix Smartphones Like Turntables

Openmix is a clever and tiny minimalist audio mixer that lets users mix and switch between two audio sources such as smartphones or tablets. The tiny mixer has two audio jacks for audio input and a third that outputs the sound to a speaker. There’s also an additional input for adding sound effects to the extremely portable setup. The project is currently seeking funding on Kickstarter.

Openmix

Openmix

Openmix

Openmix

images via Openmix

via Boing Boing

Kids React to Trying Vegemite for the First Time

“It tastes like someone tried to make food and failed horribly.”

The Fine Brothers recently challenged a group of children to try vegemite for the first time in the latest episode of their ongoing “Kids vs. Food” series. Vegemite is a salty paste made from yeast that originated in Australia where it is commonly eaten on toast or crackers. A new episode of “Kids vs. Food” is scheduled to be uploaded to the Fine Brothers REACT channel once a month.

submitted via Laughing Squid Tips

‘Ideas Are Scary’, A General Electric Ad About Innovation Featuring a Furry Monster

“Ideas are Scary” is a new ad by General Electric about the importance and difficulty of innovation featuring a furry creature attempting to fit in with its surroundings.

Ideas are scary, messy, and fragile, but under the proper care, they become something beautiful. GE is a place where ideas are nurtured and brought to life through innovations that make the world better.

Scientists Believe They Have Uncovered the Mystery of Self-Moving Death Valley ‘Sailing Stones’

A team of researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego believe they have uncovered the phenomenon behind the self-propelled “sailing stones” of Death Valley, which appear to move by themselves, leaving behind a trail in the dry river bed. In 2011, the team set up “the most boring experiment ever” to attempt to capture the stones in motion, finally seeing some results in December 2013.

Their observations show that moving the rocks requires a rare combination of events. First, the playa fills with water, which must be deep enough to form floating ice during cold winter nights but shallow enough to expose the rocks. As nighttime temperatures plummet, the pond freezes to form thin sheets of “windowpane” ice, which must be thin enough to move freely but thick enough to maintain strength.

Sailing Stones

Sailing Stones

Sailing Stones

Sailing Stones

images via Scripps