‘Impermanence’, Wonderfully Distorted Portrait Photos Created by Growing Fungus on the Film

Impermanence by Seung-Hwan Oh

In his series Impermanence, South Korean artist Seung-Hwan Oh creates wonderfully distorted photographic portraits by growing emulsion-eating fungus on his film. Oh first allows the fungus to partially destroy the developed film in a process that takes months or even years. He then digitally prints the distorted images (the film is too fragile to print in an analog process). Oh has been working on the series since 2012.

Impermanence by Seung-Hwan Oh

Impermanence by Seung-Hwan Oh

Impermanence by Seung-Hwan Oh

Impermanence by Seung-Hwan Oh

photos by Seung-Hwan Oh

via TIME

Hank Green Talks About the Importance of Expanding Your Dreams at the 2014 XOXO Festival in Portland, Oregon

“Dreams should fuel you, not define you.”

At the 2014 XOXO festival (previously) in Portland, Oregon this past September, the jovial Hank Green, known for such projects as SciShow and VlogBrothers, talks about his success in creating videos, how that success has allowed him and his brother John Green to create “good” on the internet and how dreams can be limiting unless they are expanded to allow a person to move forward in their life.

Hank Green is the benevolent leader of the Nerdfighters, a massive community of YouTube fans and creators. With his brother John, their VlogBrothers channel grew to over 2.2 million subscribers in seven years, leading to the creation of his own record label, online charity, crowdfunding platform, a dozen successful YouTube channels, and VidCon, the world’s largest convention about online video for fans and creators.

Google Executive Alan Eustace Sets New World Record With 26-Mile Parachute Jump

Earlier today in Roswell, New Mexico, Google Senior Vice President Alan Eustace performed a successful parachute jump from an altitude of nearly 26 miles, which eclipses the previous record of 24 miles set by Felix Baumgartner in 2012. To accomplish the project — dubbed Stratospheric Explorer or StratEx — Eustace enlisted the technical help of Paragon Space Development Corporation. Eustace wore a custom space suit for the jump and used a 35,000-cubic-foot helium balloon to ascend to the upper reaches of the stratosphere. After a two-hour ascent, Eustace cut his tether and plummeted to earth for 15 minutes, breaking the sound barrier before deploying his parachute for a safe landing.

Alan Eustace Sets New World Record With 26-Mile Parachute Jump
photo by J. Martin Harris Photography/PSDC

Alan Eustace Sets New World Record With 26-Mile Parachute Jump
photo by Volker D. Kern/PSDC