Artist Uses Paint, Hair, and Plastic to Transform Models into Creepy Living Replicas of Pop Culture Figures

Creepy Living Sculptures of Pop Culture Icons
Ronald McDonald

Canadian artist Marie-Lou Desmeules slathers paint, hair, fabric, paper, and plastic on models, transforming them into garish, wonderfully creepy living replicas of famous people and pop culture characters. Photos of her wondrous pop culture replicants can be viewed on her Behance portfolio and her Instagram account.

Creepy Living Sculptures of Pop Culture Icons
Steve Jobs

Creepy Living Sculptures of Pop Culture Icons
Barbie

Creepy Living Sculptures of Pop Culture Icons
Kim Jong-un

Creepy Living Sculptures of Pop Culture Icons
Andy Warhol

Creepy Living Sculptures of Pop Culture Icons
Rambo

Creepy Living Sculptures of Pop Culture Icons
Bert/Travis Bickle (Taxi Driver)

photos by Marie-Lou Desmeules

via designboom

KQED Series ‘Deep Look’ Examines How Electric Light Has Fundamentally Changed Our Lives and Our Bodies

In their latest episode, the KQED science series Deep Look examines how electric light has fundamentally changed our lives, our sleep, and even our bodies.

Humorous Antique Movie Theater Slides From 1912 Inform the Audience of Basic Theater Etiquette

Silent Movie Theater Etiquette Slides 1912

These humorous photographic slides, circa 1912, kindly inform movie theater audiences of basic theater etiquette. It turns out that even a century ago, talking was a problem at movie theaters (even though the films were silent). The slides reside in the collection of the Library of Congress.

Silent Movie Theater Etiquette Slides 1912

Silent Movie Theater Etiquette Slides 1912

Silent Movie Theater Etiquette Slides 1912

Silent Movie Theater Etiquette Slides 1912

photos via Library of Congress

via reddit, Visual News

Bioluminescent Plankton Illuminate the Waters Off Hong Kong

Bioluminescent Plankton Illuminates the Waters Off Hong Kong

Noctiluca scintillans, a species of bioluminescent plankton, illuminated a stretch of coastline near Hong Kong yesterday in a stunning display that was captured in long exposure photos by photographer Kin Cheung. Unfortunately, as The Atlantic reports, the glowing bloom is caused by farm pollution. The plankton is also known as “Sea Sparkle.”

Bioluminescent Plankton Illuminates the Waters Off Hong Kong

Bioluminescent Plankton Illuminates the Waters Off Hong Kong

photos by Kin Cheung/Associated Press

Delightful Photos Illustrate the Crystalline Beauty of Frozen Soap Bubbles

Photos of Frozen Soap Bubbles by Cheryl Johnson

New Hampshire-based artist Cheryl Johnson has been taking advantage of frigid temperatures in the Northeast United States to make frozen soap bubbles. As her delightful photos illustrate, beautiful crystalline patterns form on the bubbles when they freeze. Instructions for frozen bubbles vary online, but Johnson makes hers when temperatures drop below 15° Fahrenheit.

Apartment Therapy has instructions and a recipe for a special soap solution made specifically for frozen bubbles.

Photos of Frozen Soap Bubbles by Cheryl Johnson

Photos of Frozen Soap Bubbles by Cheryl Johnson

Photos of Frozen Soap Bubbles by Cheryl Johnson

Photos of Frozen Soap Bubbles by Cheryl Johnson

photos by Cheryl Johnson

via Twisted Sifter

The Remarkable 18-Month Effort to Repair an $11 Million Monet Painting After a Man Punched a Hole in It

Repairing a Monet Painting
photo via SWNS

Back in June 2012, an Irish man named Andrew Shannon walked into the National Gallery of Ireland in Dublin and punched a hole in an $11 million painting by Claude Monet. The painting, entitled Argenteuil Basin with a Single Sailboat, was badly torn in the incident. After the attack, museum conservators undertook an extraordinarily complex 18-month restoration of the painting. In addition to stabilizing the damage and ultimately glueing the work back together, the conservators had to research and replicate Monet’s painting technique, and reattach tiny flecks of paint that were recovered at the scene of the attack. The museum has documented the endeavor in an online feature.

In July 2014, the restored painting was put back on display at the National Gallery of Ireland. At the end of 2014, Shannon was sentenced to six years in prison for the attack. Incredibly, he is now on trial for a second attack, in which he is accused of destroying two paintings at a hotel in Ireland.

Repairing a Monet Painting
The painting was removed from public display and taken into the conservation studio for treatment. It was laid flat and stabilised from the front and back. Conservators removed the painting from its frame and documented any changes to the condition of the object. Photo via National Gallery of Ireland

Repairing a Monet Painting
Repair work to the damaged NGI canvas was carried out on the back of the painting. Before turning the painted side down onto the cushioned working surface, a temporary cover was applied to protect the vulnerable paint surface. Photo via National Gallery of Ireland

Repairing a Monet Painting
The process of tear repair involved flattening, aligning and rejoining the edges of the torn canvas. Initially the canvas was relaxed using localised application of moisture and gentle weighting for short intervals – training it to remain flat again. With the aid of a high-powered microscope and appropriately small tools, the tear edges were carefully aligned thread-by-thread. Re-joining of the realigned, broken canvas fibres involved applying a specially formulated adhesive to achieve a strong but reversible bond between the thread ends. Photo via National Gallery of Ireland

Repairing a Monet Painting
Tiny areas of paint loss (where fragments could not be reinserted) were filled with a reversible material made from chalk and a low percentage solution of animal gelatine glue. This material termed gesso, was pigmented to match the colour of the original priming layer. Photo via National Gallery of Ireland

via Hyperallergic, Gizmodo

Photographer Dad Captures a Toddler’s View of New York City by Placing a GoPro Camera in His Son’s Stroller

Toddler's View of New York City

To capture a toddler’s view of New York City, photographer Diego Acosta López placed a GoPro camera in his son Ignacio’s stroller and took the nearly two-year-old boy on a tour of the city. The camera was set to take a photo every 10 seconds, and over the course of several days and multiple outings, López recorded about 2,000 photos. Each image records an intriguing low-angle view of the city. The clear plastic cover of the stroller acts as a photo filter, rendering the city in a shimmery blur. López has assembled 18 of the best images in a photo series, entitled simply Stroller.

The New York Times Lens Blog has more on the project.

Toddler's View of New York City

Toddler's View of New York City

Toddler's View of New York City

Toddler's View of New York City

Toddler's View of New York City

photos by Diego Acosta López

submitted via Laughing Squid Tips

Researcher Develops Jazz Music-Playing Robots That Can Improvise With a Human Musician

Musician and researcher Mason Bretan plays jazz with a backup band of four robots in what at first glance appears to be a clever application of dancing robots and pre-recorded tracks, but is actually something much more remarkable. While two of the robots do indeed play prerecorded percussion, the other two are actually improvising along with Bretan’s playing. And all of them are swaying and dancing in response to the music. The largest robot, named Shimon, improvises on a marimba–a complex task that require the robot to pre-position its arms in anticipation of the next note. You can see Bretan and his robo-band in action in the six-minute improvisational piece, “What You Say.” Bretan developed the robots as part of his PhD research at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

The piece is called “What You Say” and is inspired by the high energy funk piece, “What I Say”, from Miles Davis’ Live-Evil album. The incredible brilliance of the musicians on that album (as well as the numerous other great musicians around the world) are not only an inspiration to me and my own musical and instrumental aspirations, but also set the standard for the level of musicianship that I hope machines will one day achieve. And through the power of artificial intelligence, signal processing, and engineering I firmly believe it is possible for machines to be artistic, creative, and inspirational.

via New Scientist

Delightful Photos of Demented Balloon Sculptures Created by Buster Balloon

Demented Balloon Sculptures

“B. Balloonerman,” an anonymous Brooklyn photographer, has created a wonderful photo series of chainsaw-equipped bunnies, grinning sharks, and other twisted balloon sculptures created by Buster Balloon. The photos are available for purchase as prints on the TwistedBalloon Etsy shop.

Demented Balloon Sculptures

Demented Balloon Sculptures

Demented Balloon Sculptures

Demented Balloon Sculptures

photos by B. Balloonerman

via David Friedman

Jaguar’s Bike Sense System Uses Sensors to Alert Drivers of Nearby Bicycles or Motorcycles

Jaguar recently unveiled Bike Sense, an experimental technology that alerts a driver of nearby bicycles and motorcycles in an effort to reduce accidents between cars and two-wheeled vehicles. The system uses sensors to identify nearby bikes or motorcycles, and warns the driver with a variety of cues including lights, a bicycle bell sound, and vibrations in the car’s pedals. It also works to reduce “dooring” accidents by flashing a warning light and sending a vibration through the interior door handle if a passenger tries to open the door when a bike is approaching. There’s no word on when the technology might be available in production vehicles.

Bike Sense Bicycle Alert System for Cars

photo via Jaguar