Smart Rope, A Connected Jump Rope With Embedded LEDs That Display Jump Data in Front of the User

Smart Rope is a connected jump rope created by New York City startup Tangram that features embedded LED lights that display a user’s jump data in their line of vision. The rope also communicates wirelessly with mobile devices, keeping track of data like jump count and calories burned. That information can also be shared via social network. The project is currently seeking funding on Kickstarter.

Smart Rope

Smart Rope

Smart Rope

Smart Rope

Smart Rope

images via Smart Rope

via Boing Boing

Emotiv Insight, A Wireless Headset Designed to Track Brain Fitness and Cognitive Health

The Insight is a new wearable electronic headset created by San Francisco bioinformatics startup Emotiv that is designed to track user brainwaves with several sensors, translating them into measurable data that can be viewed on a mobile device.

For the first time we can quantify and measure your brain’s performance with cutting-edge wearable tech. Emotiv Insight measures and tracks your Attention, Focus, Engagement, Interest, Excitement, Affinity, Relaxation and Stress levels.

The device, which gained funding through a Kickstarter campaign in 2013, will begin shipping in April 2015.

Insight

Insight

Insight

Insight

Insight

images via Emotiv

‘I Can Help the Next In Line’, A Vintage Infomercial-Style They Might Be Giants Dial-A-Song Music Video

For week nine of their year-long Dial-A-Song project (previously), They Might Be Giants present “I Can Help the Next in Line”–a delightful music video directed by Arizona filmmaker Alex Italics which is modeled on vintage disco-era album infomercials. The track tackles the phenomenon of waiting in line to be served.

I can help the next in line
Have you been with us before?
I can help the next in line
I don’t think I like your tone

Augmented Reality Sandbox, A Map That Uses a Microsoft Kinect to Let Users Shape Its Topography

Christoper Young captured some video of the Augmented Reality Sandbox, a project created by the UC Davis Department of Geology that utilizes a Microsoft Kinect to created a real-time interactive augmented reality map projected on a literal sandbox–which users can manipulate by moving around piles of sand.

The goal of this project was to develop a real-time integrated augmented reality system to physically create topography models which are then scanned into a computer in real time, and used as background for a variety of graphics effects and simulations. The final product is supposed to be self-contained to the point where it can be used as a hands-on exhibit in science museums with little supervision.

The Sandbox was inspired by video of a similar project created by Czech researchers.

via Digg

A Look Inside of Project Loon, Google’s Attempt to Deliver High-Speed Internet Access Through Giant Balloons

The Verge was given behind-the-scenes access to Project Loon (previously), Google’s extremely ambitious moonshot attempt to bring high-speed Internet access to underserved regions using high-altitude balloons. The project, which was given its unorthodox title due to its seemingly unprecedented nature, could also serve to provide access to communities hit by natural disaster.

There’s no weather in the stratosphere, which means if there’s a hurricane or a typhoon that knocks out power or internet connectivity to people on the ground, the balloons provide a very exciting way to let people immediately have connectivity 10 seconds after the natural disaster occurs.

Loon

loon_half_inflated.0

images via The Verge

Art in Island, An Interactive Art Museum in the Philippines That Invites Attendees to Take Photos With 3D Paintings

Art in Island

Art in Island is an art museum located in a former Manila bus station that features a slew of paintings, many of which are in 3D, designed for interaction. Museum attendees are encouraged to climb into paintings and take photos of their interactions. Art in Island corporate secretary Blyth Cambaya explained the museum’s philosophy to Mashable.

Here, art paintings are not complete if you are not with them, if you don’t take pictures with them.

Art in Island

Art in Island

Art in Island

Art in Island

images via Art in Island

A Quintet of Paper Origami Cranes Perform a Choreographed Dance Routine Using Electromagnets

Japanese hardware hacker Ugoita T. created a whimsical display of five origami cranes busting a move with choreography provided by electromagnets, which were used to manipulate the feet of the paper birds into all sorts of dance positions. Ugoita T. has also created a behind-the-scenes video detailing how the display, which was exhibited at a Honda China art event, was created.

via reddit